Brilliant Fall foliage is a point of pride here in the North Country, but what exactly causes these incredible colors? Read our new Just Our Nature blog to learn more about the science behind the fall color wheel. Photo: Jeanna Matthews

7th graders at Norwood-Norfolk Central School walk out of the woods after a lesson on nature observation with Nature Up North this September In the Schools

A student shouts— “This one! This one’s ours!” and runs back for a measuring tape. She and her partner have found their assigned maple tree on the school lawn, and are about to record seasonal observations for the first of many weeks this fall. The student, a 7th grader at Norwood-Norfolk Middle School, is participating in Monitor My Maple - one of several citizen science initiatives at Nature Up North.

Lampson Falls in early October Just Our Nature

We need to figure out a way to have Amazon deliver the weather in the future. I don’t believe Mother Nature intended to give us a record-setting wet summer; I just think all the good weather probably got misplaced on a loading dock in Topeka, or something like that.

Colton-Pierrepont Intro to Environment and Society students met with Dr. Timothy Messner from SUNY Potsdam to learn about fire-making. In the Schools

Ever made fire by hand? Students in the Intro the Environment and Society class at Colton-Pierrepont High School met with Dr. Timothy Messner, Archaeology professor at SUNY Potsdam, this September to learn how to make fire by hand using just a simple tool and the energy in their hands and breath. Below, students Summer Scovil and Ariel Garvin provide an insight into the experience:

Oyster Mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) Photo: Flickr Creative Commons, Marshal Hedin Just Our Nature

Carnivorous oysters are lurking about in the North Country, and residents who venture into the woods are advised to carry butter and a skillet at all times. Oyster mushrooms, Pleurotus ostreatus, native wood-decaying fungi often found on dead and dying hardwoods, are delectable when sautéed in butter. Maybe hikers should carry a few cloves of garlic and a press as well. It’s good to be prepared.

Layers of shale and limestone at Whitaker Falls. Photo: Helen Eifert Just Our Nature

Have you ever thought about what the earth was like millions of years ago? It’s hard to imagine the world before we were born, let alone before the human species existed. But if the history of our planet was represented by a single 24 hour day, the presence of modern humans would only be equivalent to less than 4 seconds. What do you think Earth will look like in another million years?

Events Up North

October 21, 2017

On October 21st, the St. Lawrence Land Trust will lead a trip to the Tooley Pond Road waterfalls.

October 21, 2017

Nature Up North invites interested 10th-12th graders to participate in a free field-based workshop. St.